The Bird Tribunal by Agnes Ravatn

the-bird-tribunalFor one reason or another I have not had much reading time recently. As a result this blog has fallen into a slumber with no books read, so none to review. And then another flurry of new releases from Orenda Books comes through the letterbox and I know I will regret not reading them. Somehow I have to find the time, but I don’t want to squeeze them in begrudgingly, I know that they will deserve to be absorbed fully.

The Bird Tribunal appealed initially because it is a slim volume, a shorter way back into reading than the other two, but on opening up its 185 pages they are filled with beautiful prose. Agnes Ravatn is a Norwegian author and her novel has been translated by Rosie Hedger with what feels like a very empathetic and true hand. An intriguing but simple, at least on the surface, narrative is utterly absorbing through a skilful use of language that feels very natural in English.

The cast of characters is small, tiny, but you spend quality time with them and their troubles. This is a thriller of psychology, not action, its builds slowly and surrounds you. At times it feels run of the mill but even as you think nothing is happening you feel unsettled, convinced that you could scratch the veneer off their relationship with even bitten back nails.

Allis was a television historian until her willingness to do anything to get to the top destroyed her marriage and he career. Fleeing her very public humiliation she responds to an advert for a gardener and housekeeper despite lacking the skills. From the start her relationship with Sigurd Bagge, her new employer, is peculiar and awkward, but maybe there is a sense that they also need each other.

The story is narrated by Allis so we hear her thoughts clearly but his only through her speculation. Both are seeking redemption for past failings but we are never certain whether they could accept it even if it was offered. A tense, fragile relationship develops held together by half-truths and desperation as it builds to a climax that reveals all and nothing. Do we really know Allis and Sigurd by the end? Do they really know other? And have either of them found what they need? That is what we are left to ponder and even at the end it feels awkward, unsettling and painfully beautiful.